Category: Interviews

Charlie talks ‘Frankie Go Boom’, the success of ‘Sons of Anarchy’, his desire to direct and more with Collider.com

Charlie talks ‘Frankie Go Boom’, the success of ‘Sons of Anarchy’, his desire to direct and more with Collider.com

Don’t miss the chance to check out the ENTIRE interview in full over at COLLIDER.COM

Did you immediately decide that you wanted to torture Ron Perlman and get him to play Phyllis?

HUNNAM: Yeah, pretty much! Any time I can torture Ron, I jump at the chance. Chris O’Dowd had been cast, and then I was cast. And then, we had to find the girl, so I read with a bunch of girls. When Lizzy [Caplan] came in, she was just spectacular and it became very clear that she was the choice. And then, we had no time. We had about 10 days and we needed to cast the rest of the movie. So, we had a long conversation and Ron got brought up to play the Chris Noth role. We talked about it and talked about it and talked about it, and I said, “You know, we’ve got a shot at him. He might actually come do this.” So, we sent it to him and I said, “Listen, man, we’ve got a week to cast this movie. Please, if you’re going to read it and actually engage, could you do it tonight and let us know tomorrow ‘cause we’re really up against it.” And he said, “Yeah, I’ll read it.” I figured that I wasn’t going to hear back from him, but he called me in the morning and said, “Okay, I read the script.” I said, “What do you think of the role?,” and he said, “I don’t like it.” I said, “Okay, well, thanks for reading it,” and he said, “Wait, I want to play Phyllis.” I said, “What?! What are you talking about, man?,” and he said, “Charlie, I need you to keep this just between you and I. I have always secretly wanted to play a woman.” I said, “You’re a twisted dude, but I think the director is going to be very excited to hear that.” So, I told Jordan and he just laughed hysterically and said, “Tell him, he’s got the job,” and that was that. And then, Ron shot his entire performance in one day. He just came in and did it, and it was fun.

What was your reaction when you saw him in the make-up and wardrobe? Was it ever hard not to laugh?

HUNNAM: It was just like we won the lottery, when he stepped out of the trailer. We flip-flopped. Normally, I’m the crazy one that’s being a bit method, but he just turned into Phyllis. I said, “Whoa, man, this is just too deliciously absurd for words! I can’t believe what I’m looking at right now!” And he said, “Oh, stop it, darling! Now, walk me to set.” So, he put his arm out and we walked, arm-in-arm, to set. I thought, “This is so perverse and absurd, but I kind of love it.”

Have you always had an eye on writing and directing, at some point?

HUNNAM: I got expelled from high school, and then did my exams from home. I decided, through that experience, that I was going to expediate my plan and didn’t go to university. Instead, I went to a community college and studied the theory and history of film with the idea that I wanted to write and direct. And then, through that, I got an opportunity to act, which then just took precedence. But, it’s just been growing in me. Right before I got Sons of Anarchy, I actually quit acting for 18 months and didn’t read a single script, and I wrote a film. I felt like I needed to do something that I had control over, as an artist, and also just do something where I felt like I had some control over my life, as just a human, out in the world. Being at the mercy of the acting profession, in the early days of one’s career, is really brutal and feels like you have no control over your life, at all.

So, I actually just finished writing that screenplay and managed to sell it, and then was going to start writing something else when Sons of Anarchy landed on my desk. I just thought, “A TV show is not really anything that I’m that interested in doing.” I called my agent and was like, “Really? Why are you sending me a TV show? You’ve never sent me a TV show before, and we’ve never talked about me doing a TV show.” He said, “Just read it, bro.” So, I read it and was like, “Holy shit!” The quality of the writing was so much better than all of the films I had been reading. It was actually an original idea. A guy wanted to tell a family drama, set against the backdrop of a motorcycle club. There had been some biker exploitation movies made in the ‘70s, but they were all terrible. Never had this vastly interesting, rich world been explored before. I was like, “Wow, this is a guy who’s really trying to do something.”

What is the movie you wrote that you want to direct?

HUNNAM: I don’t want to talk about it too much because it’s so far away. But, I’m going to try to make it in two and a half years’ time, when we finish Sons, altogether. It’s going to star Tommy Flanagan, who plays Chibs on the show. He’s been one of my best friends for years. I’d known him for years, before we did Sons together. I’ve known Tommy, for years and years. It’s a film set in England, about a part of English society that’s really seldom been explored, but is one of the most colorful and interesting parts of British society. We’re just going to make it for no money at all, and go and do it. We’re just two best friends, going to make a movie. If I can actually go make it, I’ll be able to give Tommy his first ever leading role. That guy is way overdue. I think he’s one of the most talented guys out there. He’s just gonna be so beautiful, as this guy. Hopefully, we’ll get it made and march fearlessly in the direction of our dreams.

Charlie Hunnam & Lizzy Caplan on the low-budget fun and insane physical comedy of ‘3, 2, 1… Frankie Go Boom’

Charlie Hunnam & Lizzy Caplan on the low-budget fun and insane physical comedy of ‘3, 2, 1… Frankie Go Boom’

Make sure you check out the entire interview with Charlie and his Frankie Go Boom co-star Lizzy Caplan over at BUZZINEFILM.COM – It’s hilarious!

Q: You and Ron have now done three projects together, and we were wondering, are the two of you having this built into your contracts now, that one doesn’t work unless the other is brought in?

Charlie Hunnam: You know, safety in numbers. Why not? We’re huge stars now. We get to call the shots, so why not just bend them to our will?

Lizzy Caplan: What’s the third one?

Q: Pacific Rim.

CH: Ahhh, just this little three hundred million dollar movie [laughs] that we’ve just done, doesn’t matter.

LC: I really don’t follow Charlie’s career, I mean I knownothing about him! Nothing.

Q: How much rehearsal time, if at all, do you have to develop the chemistry that you have on screen?

CH: I think it’s just innate.

LC: I’m a genius actress. I mean, really good.

CH: And we’re just clearly very attracted to each other.

LC: Oh god. If you even knew what was happening beneath this table right now… [Laughs]

CH: We didn’t actually really have much time at all. You know what I think was actually kind of a fun thing, is that we did all of the rehearsal and costume and make up and everything all at Jordan’s house. So we kind of, that’s the thing that I remember, more than any rehearsal, I think you were there [looks at Caplan] – ‘cause I cut my locks off for this movie –

LC: You were such a crybaby about it.

CH: I was such a crybaby about it, but those guys were there to witness it and hold my hand through the process. So we had probably two or three days of hanging, but this whole thing was a very, very fast process. We shot the film I believe in 20 days… 19 or 20 days –

LC: Yeah, something like that.

CH: – for no money at all, and it was really just kind of – more than any type of rehearsal or bonding or anything, I just feel like the movie had something of an energy to it, that was just like, none of us had to do this, or [do it] for money, ‘cause none of us were getting paid. And it was just kind of a fun couple of days, a fun four week romp that we got together and had this experience together. You know, it just felt kind of free –

LC: Summer camp!

CH: And summer campy –

LC: Yeah, you really have to want to be there because you’re definitely not doing it for any of the creature comforts. And they were long days, and some of them were hard days. But it was you know, it was fun. Chris O’Dowd was fantastic. Like our whole cast – I’m such a fan of all of theirs, except for Charlie… and so, I was just having a good time hanging out with all those guys. And I knew Whitney [Cummings] for a few years before…

CH: Ah yes, Whitney.

Charlie discusses ‘Frankie Go Boom’, Internet Piracy, being a younger brother & more with ShockYa.com

Charlie discusses ‘Frankie Go Boom’, Internet Piracy, being a younger brother & more with ShockYa.com

Don’t miss out on Charlie’s entire interview, head on over to SHOCKYA.COM to read it now!

ShockYa: So Jordan was just telling me that this movie is the most pirated on the web this week. What do you make of that?

Charlie Hunnam: It’s just one of these unfortunate realities of this technological revolution. It’s easier to make films like this and get them out into the marketplace, for people to see them. We don’t have to have a huge distribution deal and 1,000 screens to get it out there, but the flipside of that is that it’s much easier to then go and pirate that material and send it out into the world. You know, of course, not being the financier, my feeling is that I really wish people wouldn’t pirate, because it makes it more difficult to make films… but there’s still a certain satisfaction that people are going out and seeking out the material, seeking out the thing we made. It’s a tricky thing.

ShockYa: Did you ever download illegal music via Napster or anything when you were younger?

CH: No, I really didn’t — partly because I’m not really technologically savvy, and partly because I grew up in a very backwards place, an economically and socially depressed area that was definitely 10 years behind the rest of the south of England, Newcastle Upon Tyne. I actually didn’t even really have access to a computer until I was 18 or so. I’d never sent an email or anything like that. You know, if you grew up in Los Angeles at the same age as me you would have had a computer at age 12, but it just wasn’t a reality for me. And so by the time I got connected, I was already working in this business and wouldn’t and couldn’t justify stealing the product that I was participating in making, you know? Sometimes a friend of mine and I will be talking about a new band and they’ll be like, “Will you burn that for me?” And I’ll be like, “Yeah, yeah,” but then I’ll be like, “I’d actually rather just give you the money and let you go buy it.” I actually really enjoy corporate theft — I’m not a guy who particularly has a weak stomach when it comes to crime. I have a lot of friends who are criminals – just, like, actively, everyday gangsters, and I have no problem with that whatsoever. A friend of mine robbed 32 banks and ended up [getting] caught, did his time, and is out now, and that’s behind him. But he targeted institutions that he didn’t think were righteous — big banks that are not being very nice to their customers. He was a righteous gangster. And his story I just find absolutely marvelous. But it seems like stealing from artists, knowing what it is to be a struggling artist, doesn’t seem that cool to me. Hurting the individual I really disdain; hurting big corporate America I kind of absolutely admire.

ShockYa: You’re a younger brother in real life, right? Did any of your experiences jibe with Frank’s in the movie?

CH: Yes, I’d completely forgotten about that. I definitely do feel some similarities, though. I [told Jordan my brother is] one of the toughest guys I’ve ever met — the kind of guy, at least when we were growing up together, where you’d go out on a night of drinking and you might end up on a stolen boat in the North Sea, because at some point in the night he might say, “Yo, let’s go sailing!” And this is that type of guy — totally dominated by brother. As I was. Now I have two younger brothers too, because I’m in the middle, and so for a period of time I dominated them too, because that’s how it works with brothers — you just pay it forward.

Charlie talks ‘Frankie Go Boom’ with The Hollywood Reporter

Charlie discusses Vespa vs Harley, the Brad Pitt Curse and more with ELLE.COM!

Name: Charlie Hunnam
Age: 32
Provenance: Newcastle, England
Relationship status: In a Relationship (with Morgana McNelis)

On the “Brad Pitt” curse: “I was playing pretty boys and these angelic roles like Nicholas Nickleby and all that stuff. And I was like, ‘What am I doing? This isn’t who I am, as a man or an artist.’ I had to overcome people’s belief that I was too pretty to be a badass.”

On initially resisting the role of Frankie: “It seemed too much of a stretch. I’ve been playing Jax Teller for so long and these other aggressive roles. I thought it would take me awhile to get out of that and into a place where I could play this meek, put-upon, dorky guy.”

On Vespa versus Harley: “I don’t think I’ve been on a Vespa? Oh, that’s right…for this movie! I have two motorcycles. This is my pride and joy [reveals a picture of his Harley Davidson].  No comparison. I would rather be the guy steering the big Harley. It’s empowering and makes you feel like a badass. [The Vespa] is really humiliating and makes you feel like an idiot.”

On similarities to Jax Teller: “A lot of my friends are gangsters. Not like gangsters–well, yeah, all sorts of levels of criminality—but not the types that are preying on innocent people. I have no interest in the type of criminality that has no respect for collateral damage. But I don’t condemn the guys who say,  ‘This society we’ve created is kind of [messed up], and I’m willing to take it down—for selfish gain—but also to make a point.'”.

On receiving jewelry from his girlfriend: “She told me she was making me a diamond encrusted ring—she’s a jewelry designer, not an actor—and I was like ‘Uh-oh. This is not going to go well for me.’  But I love it. It’s so discrete and beautiful. Her company is Maison de Morgana.

source

Charlie Talks with Playboy.com about ‘Frankie Go Boom’, ‘Sons of Anarchy’ and more!

Charlie Talks with Playboy.com about ‘Frankie Go Boom’, ‘Sons of Anarchy’ and more!

You can check out this fantastic interview in full over at PLAYBOY.com

Playboy.com: What was the most bizarre scene to film in FGB?

Hunnam: I think having to wrestle that pig, it was a harrowing experience. They are very aggressive, strong, loud creatures. I mean you can’t even believe the noise and ferociousness of this little beast. He was so placid before I picked him up, and the second I did he pissed all over me. Screaming and crying and wriggling and tried to bite me! I was like wow; could we not get a prosthetic pig? But then he got used to me and was a little better to work with.

Playboy.com: The fifth season of Sons of Anarchy just started up, what can we look forward to this season?

Hunnam: It has felt to me like a fresh, really new dynamic within the club. Now that I’m President, it went from overnight, the old school dictatorship – to the new, cool democracy. The young and up-and-coming guys in the club like me and Chibs and Tig and those guys are really starting to run the show a little bit more. Of course Clay (Ron Pearlman) still has a dangerous presence hanging over the guys, and you never know what to expect from that guy but it really feels..and Pearlman actually just walked into this room – it’s always going to be a little bit contentious between them.

Playboy.com: Sons’ creator Kurt Sutter is known to be very transparent in his opinion of the media, the industry and entertainment as a whole. What is it like working with him and how does it affects his role on the show compared to working on other projects?

Hunnam: Of course I have a great relationship with Kurt and interact with him often. But in terms of the day-to-day making of the show, he’s not that involved with my part of it. He writes every episode, and he edits every episode; but he only directs the finale. When’s he not directing he doesn’t come to set.

He’s a very opinionated guy; we have a different strategy in that regard. I only want to be known for my work. I’m an actor and I’m a writer and that’s all I want. I have no interest in being a celebrity or a personality – or even to share my opinions publically. I want to share my opinion as a character in a film, not my opinion as an actor in the world. But that’s fine if he wants to go out and kind of make his narration on how he sees things. That’s his prerogative; I just have a different approach personally. That’s because I’m not so sure about my opinions. For an actor, anonymity is the absolute best friend, because then you can reside solely in the world of the characters you play.

After a while, in the period when Tom Cruise was out talking about his stuff, you get the sense – that when you’re walking into a Tom Cruise movie, you do that with baggage. I like the Daniel Day Lewis route, where you go in and you show up every three years, and you never hear anything otherwise. Though, there’s absolutely part of an actor’s life where he’s required to go out and publicize his movie. But still that’s not me talking about myself, that’s me talking about my movie.

Charlie Hunnam, Lizzy Caplan, and Ron Perlman Talk ‘Frankie Go Boom’ with Backstage.com

Charlie Hunnam, Lizzy Caplan, and Ron Perlman Talk ‘Frankie Go Boom’ with Backstage.com

Be sure to check out the entire interview over at Backstage.com!

How did you go about landing your roles?
Charlie Hunnam: I wasn’t really looking to do comedy, because I’m not really very funny. But Jordan approached me, and for some reason he came to the conclusion I was the guy he wanted and pursued me relentlessly. And it just seemed like there was no risk, really. We made this film for $400,000 in 19 days, and I thought, Why not? It’s either going to be a piece of shit and no one will see it, or it will be great and a fun experience.
Ron Perlman: Little did we know it was going to fall somewhere in the middle, which is our worst nightmare. It’s just good enough that we have to promote it!
Lizzy Caplan: I read the script and thought it was really funny. I think this was around the time I wasn’t super pumped about doing a tiny, tiny movie, but I heard Charlie was attached, and it was an interesting choice because they weren’t going for…
Hunnam: A funny guy?
Caplan: Well, I thought it was a great choice. And I thought it would be a challenge to do some of the weird shit Lassie has to do.
Perlman: I was brought in by Charlie, actually. We had just finished a season of “Sons,” and he said, “This is my summer vacation project, my arts and crafts thing, and the director would like me to pass it on to you.” I was supposed to look at the role Chris Noth ended up playing, but I then get to Phyllis. And there’s this gesture when he meets Frankie—I ask for my hand to be kissed. And I was just thinking of all those “Sons of Anarchy” fans. And I realized that even if I blow this performance, that shot alone will be worth the price of admission.
Caplan: I feel like we all got to play against type, and it was fun to take a swing at something with very low stakes.
Perlman: That’s why one does these little films; you get a chance to do things you wouldn’t normally get to do if the film was more mainstream.

So is Charlie really not funny?
Caplan: No. Not on purpose.
Hunnam: I’m not. Not in the least.
Perlman: I think he can be, but you can never predict it. And actually, comedy only works if you don’t play it for the laughs. You have to immerse yourself in the seriousness of it; therein lies the incongruity.

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