Category: Lost City of Z

Charlie Hunnam Gushes About His Girlfriend, Reveals How He Prepped to Play a Dad

When it comes to Charlie Hunnam’s role in The Lost City of Z, we imagine it must have been hard to prepare. After all, the story is set in the 1920s and it’s all about a British explorer named Percy Fawcett who disappears into the Amazon jungle, hoping to find a long-lost civilization. That’s pretty far-flung from an actor in the 21st century, but Charlie was up to the challenge. We interviewed him at the LA premiere for the film, where he shed a bit of insight into his preparation process. And, well, let’s just say it wasn’t a walk in the park. In fact, there was quite a bit of sacrifice.

“In this film particularly, Fawcett made an enormous amount of sacrifice for his work. You know, he would go away, and obviously in a time when we didn’t have a lot of the technical luxury we do now, and he would be away from his wife for three or four years at a time. So, it’s always good to remove oneself as much as possible from the distractions of life when working, because it requires 100 percent absolute focus. But for this, also, it was played into specifically some of the hardship that the character that I was playing had experienced. So, it was sort of a no-brainer to me. Switch the phone off, switch the computer off, say, ‘All right, I’ll see everyone in four months.’ But, you know, I will say you have to have incredibly supportive and understanding people around you to allow you to do these types of things. I’ve been with my girlfriend for 12 years, and I said, ‘Would it be OK if we don’t talk for the next four months?’ A lot of people would say, ‘Go f*ck yourself.’ My girlfriend said, ‘Hey, listen, you know, I know how important your work is to you, so just go do whatever you need to do.'”

Aside from the whole “losing contact with everyone in your life” thing, there was another aspect of Charlie’s character that, at first glance, may have posed a problem. In the film, Percy has a son named Jack Fawcett, who’s played by Tom Holland (who will also star in Spider-Man: Homecoming later this year). Charlie isn’t a father (yet), so we were curious about whether he had trouble getting into that mindset.

“I have younger brothers that I have felt very paternal towards,” Charlie explained. “I mean, they have a father of their own, but they’re so much younger than me that I’ve always felt very protective and I’ve wanted to impart whatever gossamer amount of wisdom that I have to them. So, I guess, no is the short answer.”

With such a supportive girlfriend and that lovely family experience, it’s safe to say Charlie is a lucky guy.

Source: popsugar.com

Charlie Talks with Entertainment Weekly

In case you missed it, you can watch the live Facebook interview Charlie did with Entertainment Weekly where he discussed his film Lost City of Z, his future projects American Drug Lord, Vlad and more. Definitely worth a watch. Check it out below:

Da Man: Charlie Hunnam Tells His Tale Of Being King

Da Man: Charlie Hunnam Tells His Tale Of Being King

KING OF THE STREETS. English actor Charlie Hunnam chats with DA MAN about the new, epic stories he will bring to life in the months to come

When you’ve played one of TV’s most popular anti-heroes and the most badass giant robot pilot ever to grace the silver screen, how can you ever top that? Well, Charlie Hunnam—who played outlaw biker Jackson Teller in hit TV series “Sons of Anarchy” and Jaeger pilot Raleigh Becket in the widely-acclaimed “Pacific Rim,” among many others—is set to do just that this year with at least three major movie appearances. It starts with the epic “The Lost City of Z” which is based on a true story this April, followed closely by “King Arthur: Legend of the Sword” where Hunnam brings out a more street-smart version of the legendary king this May. Later this year, he will also appear in “Papillon,” a remake of the immensely popular 1973 movie of the same name. And here to share the stories-behind-the-stories of these highly-anticipated titles is the star of all three himself.

DA MAN: Hi, Charlie. “King Arthur: Legend of the Sword” is set to hit theaters this May. What would you say is the number-one reason to go see this movie when it comes out?
Charlie Hunnam:
Because it’s a cool, fun, fresh, original, badass, two-hour extravaganza. We have magic, fighting, pretty girls, pretty boys and a sh-tload of laughs. [Chuckles] If I had to sum it up with one adjective it would be “fun!”

DA MAN: We did a bit of research, and found that film adaptations of Arthurian legend date back all the way to 1904. What will this 2017 version do differently from its predecessors?
Charlie Hunnam:
Guy’s [director Guy Ritchie] sensibility as a director is very contemporary, so the style and tone of the film is completely fresh for this genre, and the story itself is very different from any of its predecessors. Arthur has always been portrayed as the noble man, who goes on a noble quest to become a noble king. Guy said, “let’s make Arthur a motherf—-r.” We are only telling the first chapter of the story, so making Arthur conflicted, angry and scared at the beginning gives greater breadth to his journey and makes for a more interesting character.

DA MAN: You famously said that you would do 500 push-ups a day to prepare yourself for the role. And you also offered to fight the other two finalists—Henry Cavill and Jai Courtney, if we’re not mistaken—when the issue of King Arthur’s physicality came up again and again. Were you really that confident that you could take on Superman and Captain Boomerang at once?
Charlie Hunnam:
[Laughs] Are you trying to get me into a fight? Okay, I’ll answer in order. Yes, I did an enormous amount of push-ups while making this film. Not always 500, sometimes less, sometimes more. The most I ever did was 1,050 in a day. There were also days I did none. With regards to fighting the competition … Sure, I’d take them both on. I actually didn’t know who the other dudes were but I love a good fight, and Guy kept pestering me about how skinny I was at the time. So, I said “F–k it, let me fight for the role.” All in good fun, though. I respect both those guys; I’m not trying to start any trouble. In the immortal words of RZA, “I’m vegetarian, b—h, I don’t want the beef.”

DA MAN: On a more serious note, you did bulk up impressively. How, exactly, did you do it?
Charlie Hunnam:
In the usual way, nothing exciting. I ate enormous amounts of food and worked out like a bastard every day. I prefer calisthenic-style exercises, so the majority of my training was pull-ups, push-ups, dips and non-weighted squats. I also boxed every day and did a bit of jiu-jitsu. Continue reading

Charlie Attends ‘Lost City of Z’ Los Angeles Premiere

Charlie Attends ‘Lost City of Z’ Los Angeles Premiere

Charlie joined the cast of Lost City of Z as they posed on the red carpet premiere in Los Angeles on April 5th. You can check out many photos from the event in the gallery now.


‘Lost City of Z’ Behind the Scenes Featurette

New ‘Lost City of Z’ Poster Featuring Charlie

Check out the new poster for Lost City of Z featuring Charlie at the forefront.

Charlie Hunnam: Robert Pattinson didn’t speak to me during ‘The Lost City Of Z’

Charlie Hunnam: Robert Pattinson didn’t speak to me during ‘The Lost City Of Z’

Screen: When you first read James Gray’s screenplay for The Lost City Of Z, what were your thoughts?

Charlie Hunnam: My initial reaction to reading James’s script was one of total joy and terror. It was, bar none, the best script I’ve ever read. It felt to me like the biggest challenge I had been given so far so I wanted to immediately jump in and give it everything I had.

You had just finishing shooting Guy Ritchie’s King Arthur: Legend of the Sword before The Lost City Of Z. Can you talk about that transition?

King Arthur was incredibly demanding: I was in almost every scene and shooting long hours. By the time we finished shooting, I only had ten days before I started shooting this. I was filled with panic. I used every second of that time to try and transform myself psychologically and physically because I was muscle bound and in action hero mode.

I went through this very rapid process of losing weight [approximately 60lbs in nine weeks]. I wanted to fill myself up with [Percy] Fawcett, I had been slowly and quietly researching. One of the things he admired most as a human characteristic was authenticity, and so it was important for me to put a level of myself into playing him, as much as honouring who I thought he was. I fell in love with Fawcett and felt a responsibility to do him justice.

What was it like working with Sienna Miller, Robert Pattinson and [Bafta Rising Star winner] Tom Holland?

I had a couple of rehearsal sessions with Sienna, but I didn’t spend any time with Tom or Robert. I wanted these relationships to evolve naturally on screen. Through the work, I don’t think I said more than ten words to Robert [Pattinson] off camera. I didn’t know if he was just ‘in that zone’ or if he genuinely didn’t like me. There was a real distance between us. But it creates the right dynamic on screen. He’s reached out to me subsequently, making overtures for us to be friends now, so I think it was about the work.

How was working with James Gray, a director who is more known for his success in the independent sector [We Own The Night, Two Lovers] rather than larger scale action films?

James is my kind of director. There was no actual rehearsal in terms of reading scenes, but there were a lot of one-on-one conversations [mainly with James] discussing characters, themes and story. His understanding of narrative and the filmmaking process is so absolute. I felt freed to take risks. Some filmmakers start to make too many choices and the essence of your performance can be lost. But with James, I just knew he got it.

In terms of the size of a movie – that never matters because it is about the human journey in the middle of it. And if you have a good crew around you, the size of a movie just means there will be a few more extras and a few more crew members. James is very insular with his approach to the crew. He is behind the monitor, only speaking with the first AD, the DoP and his actors. So, the film felt intimate. Day to day, I didn’t talk to anyone but James.

What were the challenges in shooting in the Amazon (Santa Marta, Columbia acting as the Bolivian Rain Forest)?

[Percy] Fawcett had this distinct indestructibility – he would go on these explorations where half the men would die, or get gangrene, or were missing limbs, and he seemed like he didn’t get as much as a mosquito bite. So there was this sense that I had to stand up straight in any condition. And I found the more difficult the shooting became, the more engaged I felt in the process.

In addition to a large beetle getting stuck in my ear, the most dramatic experience we had was when we had to evacuate because of the thunder and lightning. The first time the river was rising rapidly, and we couldn’t sail down the river, so instead we had to hike through the jungle in the middle of the night to get to base.

The other time we were very far up the river when a bolt of lightning hit a tree, and knocked me off my feet. I was in the middle of this impassioned plea for us to stay telling James, “This is precisely what we fucking came here for! Roll the camera!”. Then another bolt of lightning came down and James said, “Can we leave now?”

What were your living conditions like?

I wanted to be away from everybody, in a scaled back version of living as much as possible. They found this tiny hotel for me that was basically like little huts in the jungle where I could be by myself. I was so engaged in this process of no emails, no phone – I didn’t speak to the rest of the outside world during the duration of the shooting. When we started shooting the explorations, the others wanted to stay in my hotel, but I couldn’t break the [silent] spell. I just avoided them in the lunch room.

You’ve worked with several strong-minded directors, including Sons of Anarchy showrunner Kurt Sutter and most recently Guy Richie. How is the working experience different to working with someone like James Gray?

Every director has their own process. With Kurt, he became like my big brother. We found this process to marry our styles, and we became deep collaborators.

The thing about Guy is that he has the greatest ability on set of any director I have ever seen. Equal to his ability on set is his inability to synthesise what is going to happen before he gets on set. So when you get to work on any given day, you have no idea what you are going to shoot.

Often he would come on set, and we would read through our lines and he would say, “No, no, no. This is fucking shit!” I am very homework intensive: I prepare at great length what is in the script. So it required for me to become very fluid in my process and to be able to think on my feet.

What upcoming projects are you working on? Will you be involved in the Sons of Anarchy spin-off Mayans MC?

No, I won’t be involved in the spin-off. Right now, I am furiously developing a bunch of stuff. I have four movies in different stages of development that are set up at studios. A couple I have hired writers for, and a couple I am writing myself. That’s the next phase, there is no television at the moment. But I’m very excited about these movies.

Source: screendaily.com

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