Photos: Special LA Screening for ‘The Devil You Know’

Hey guys! It’s been a while since we’ve seen Charlie on the red carpet and as it turns out he snuck in an appearance at the Screening for ‘The Devil You Know’ in Los Angeles on March 24th.

You can check out the photos in the gallery now. Doesn’t he look great? 😀

News: Charlie Hunnam, Djimon Hounsou, Bae Doona, Ray Fisher Join Zack Snyder’s ‘Rebel Moon’

HollywoodReporter.com — Charlie Hunnam, Djimon Hounsou, Bae Doona and Ray Fisher have boarded the starship to Rebel Moon, the epic sci-fi fantasy feature that Zack Snyder is directing for Netflix.

Jena Malone, Staz Nair, E. Duffy, Charlotte Maggi and Sky Yang have also signed on for parts in the feature, which is slated to begin shooting in April.

Sofia Boutella is leading the ensemble in the story of a peaceful colony on the edge of the galaxy that is threatened by the armies of a tyrannical regent named Belisarius. Desperate, the colonists dispatch a young woman with a mysterious past to seek out warriors from neighboring planets to help them make a stand.

Character details are about as easy to find as an honest galactic mercenary, but sources say Hounsou is playing a character named General Titus (good/bad guy status unknown), Bae is a nemesis who is proficient with a sword, while Fisher is a resistance fighter named Blood Axe.

Snyder co-wrote the script with Army of the Dead co-screenwriter Shay Hatten and Kurt Johnstad, who co-wrote 300, Snyder’s adaptation of the Frank Miller comic. Snyder and Johnstad are receiving story-by credit.

News/Video: Action Comedy ‘Last Looks’ Gets February Release Date

Deadline.com — RLJE Films has acquired North American rights to Last Looks, an action comedy toplined by Charlie Hunnam and Mel Gibson. Morena Baccarin, Rupert Friend, Dominic Monaghan, Lucy Fry and Cliff “Method Man” Smith also star in the pic, directed by Tim Kirkby (Brockmire) and originally titled Waldo after the lead character in Howard Michael Gould’s L.A. detective novel series on which the film is based.

RLJE Films is planning a February release day-and-date in theaters and on VOD.

Adapted by Gould (Mr. 3000) and named after the first book in his three-book series, Last Looks introduces to the big screen Charlie Waldo (Hunnam), an ex-LAPD superstar who left the force and now lives a life of simplicity and solitude deep in the woods. Alistair Pinch (Gibson) is an eccentric actor who spends his days drunk on the set of his TV show. When Pinch’s wife is found dead, he is the prime suspect and Waldo is convinced to come out of retirement to investigate what happened.

The case finds Waldo contending with gangsters, Hollywood executives and preschool teachers, all in pursuit of clearing Pinch’s name, or confirming his guilt.

Photos: 2020 Public Appearances + Television Appearances Screen Captures

Hey y’all! I’ve taken some time to add photos of Charlie from his 2020 public appearances and television interviews that were taken while he was promoting ‘The Gentlemen’ last year. Truth is I simply forgot about these photos and hadn’t realized I never uploaded them to the gallery… so my bad!

Anyway, you can check out high quality photos and screen captures in the gallery now. Enjoy! 🙂




Photos: 2019 Toronto International Film Festival Photoshoot Add-Ons

Hey guys! I’ve finally taken the time to add the additional photoshoot outtakes of Charlie from his 2019 Toronto International Film Festival photo sessions into the gallery. You can find many handsome new shots of Charlie taken while promoting his films ‘Jungleland’ and ‘The True History of the Kelly Gang’ while in Toronto, Canada last September.



Press: Paramount Sets January 2021 DVD-Only Release Date for ‘Jungleland’

MediaPlayNews.comParamount Home Entertainment has set a Jan. 12, 2021, DVD-only release date for Jungleland, a buddy film from Vertical Entertainment that stars Charlie Hunnam, Jack O’Connell and Jessica Barden.

Earlier, the film was released Nov. 10 on premium VOD and for digital purchase — four days after its theatrical debut, in a limited release.

Directed and co-written by Max Winkler, Jungleland was produced by Romulus Entertainment in association with Scott Free Productions and Big Red Films.

The movie follows two brothers whose bond is tested as they hustle and scrape toward their slice of the American Dream. Stanley (Hunnam) and Lion (O’Connell) are brothers struggling to stay relevant in the underground world of bare-knuckle boxing. When Stanley fails to pay back a dangerous crime boss, they’re forced to deliver an unexpected traveler  as they journey across the country for a high stakes fighting tournament. While Stanley trains Lion for the fight of his life, a series of events threaten to tear the brothers apart, but their love for one another and belief in a better life keep them going in this gripping drama that proves family pulls no punches.

Jungleland premiered at the Toronto International Film Festival.

Press: Charlie Hunnam On Choosing Vulnerable Roles, Becoming a Writer and Finding Inspiration in Joe Rogan

GQ.com — It’s startling how often Charlie Hunnam’s character loses in his new movie, Jungleland. Hunnam’s breakthrough role was in Sons of Anarchy, where he played a charming rogue who was often two steps ahead of everyone else. Since then, Hunnam mostly hasn’t strayed far from Jax Teller types—some have been more heroic, like his leading man turn in Guillermo del Toro’s Pacific Rim, and others more homicidal, like this year’s Guy Ritchie gangster-fest The Gentlemen. But he’s never been quite as desperate as he is here playing Stanley, a perennially struggling hustler who hides behind a veneer of optimism and bets his entire future on his boxing younger brother, Jack.

Jungleland chronicles the brothers’ cross-country journey to an underground boxing tournament and the tests their relationship faces on the way, with a few crime bosses (Jonathan Majors, John Cullum) thrown in for good measure. Ten years ago, Hunnam would have likely played the sensitive brother with fists of fury, but he says that expectation is exactly what drove him towards the hapless manager instead. Hunnam wants to push into a new phase of his career: He turned 40 in April, and that milestone in combination with quarantine has reoriented his actor’s goals and priorities, and as he talked about them, his excitement was palpable.

When you look at the logline and see ‘Charlie Hunnam boxing movie,’ the immediate expectation is that you’re throwing the punches, not playing a guy who gets knocked out by a civilian dad in a pizzeria. This role is really unlike any I’ve seen you in before. I’m used to you playing characters who are more in control.

Yeah. I mean, you reach a certain age—I’m 40 years old. You stop playing the boxer and you start playing the manager. It’s just the natural cycle of life. I think that there are rhythms in one’s life and career, and things in my late twenties and early thirties that I was working through, certain aspects of my personality that I was interested in exploring through work. And I think [you’re] right. Growing up feeling like I didn’t have a lot of control and —I was a sensitive guy in a really tough environment. And so that created a bit of trauma and a little bit of self-loathing and I wanted to explore that and work through it in some of the characters that I was playing. But, thankfully I’ve worked through that and those types of character are just not quite as interesting to me anymore.

So what interested you about Stanley?

The environment that we were living in at the time that [Jungleland] got offered to me, where there was a lot of emphasis being put on toxic masculinity, I thought that there was just something really beautiful to explore about the genesis of where that comes from, men’s inability to be vulnerable with each other or to express love. Really, this whole film is about these two guys who desperately love each other. And, that gets expressed in wrong, inelegant ways.

There were several different elements of it. First and foremost, it’s always just the quality of the writing. [Stanley is] a character that I hadn’t seen very much and I thought it really just felt fresh and exciting. And then, there was something really beautiful and tender about their relationship and the clear love that these two men had for each other. Obviously there’s a lovely, traditional love story between the Jessica Barden and Jack O’Connell characters. But to me when I read it, I felt like the most central love story was really between these two brothers.

And to go back to what we were saying: Maybe I’ve been wearing a mask a little bit in some of the characters that I’ve been playing in my twenties and early thirties and there was just something very tragic and vulnerable about this family that I was really attracted to. It felt like there was more opportunity to just be a little bit more vulnerable, a little bit more raw.

Vulnerability and toxic masculinity are definitely more prevalent in this movie, but I feel like a lot of your past roles, even the action stuff like Sons of Anarchy, always made time to engage with those things.

I’m a relatively sensitive guy and take storytelling very seriously. I’m always looking for the opportunity in my work to try to find some truth. And that is really where acting gets exciting. I mean, with Sons of Anarchy, that was a guy who, had he been born into a different environment, would have had the potential to be a doctor, a photographer or a writer. There was something sensitive and very present about him and his own emotional awareness.

To a certain degree you have these aspirations to imbue characters with certain traits. But the material dictates it. And so sometimes in a show like Sons, you have to fight against the tides to try to get those moments in. That’s not exactly true because Kurt [Sutter] is a sensitive guy too and he was looking for those moments. But, you have to make a character as well-rounded as possible, so that he feels like a human being, even in a heightened environment like Sons.

What was your mindset going into this new chapter of your life, as you turn 40? How are you making choices now?

Well, one of the main things that I’m doing in my career right now is transitioning much more into writing and producing, which has been an aspiration of mine for many years. And I’ve been trying to do that in a very concentrated way, in the last five years. But there’s only so many hours in the day. And I realized that with all of the good intentions, there was just a reality to the bandwidth that I have on any given day.

In terms of specifically the things I want to explore, it’s really, really varied. And it’s often sort of story-specific. But just generally I’m very, very excited about writing. I’ve spent these last six to eight months writing five hours a week. I wrote a screenplay and I wrote a television show, a six-part television show. And right now I’m in the middle of writing a miniseries.

I’m creating opportunities for myself to act within that, but it’s funny—you get on this trajectory and one gets known for one’s work and it’s very easy for people to just say, ‘okay, we need a tough guy who can also be sensitive. Let’s see if Hunnam is interested.’ And it does take a very concentrated effort to recognize that and try to break out of it. So the joy of writing is that I know what’s in my heart and I also have a sense of what I will be able to do as an actor. I’ve not really been writing myself any tough guys and [instead] writing characters that are, I suppose, reflective of where I am in my life. They’re in that midpoint of life and career and wondering, ‘is this manifesting in exactly the way I hoped? And if not, what steps can be taken to course-correct and to arrive at the promised land?’

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