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Press: Charlie Hunnam Says He Is ‘100 Percent’ Open to Playing James Bond: I Would Be ‘Flattered’

People.com — The name’s Hunnam. Charlie Hunnam.

While speaking to PEOPLE ahead of the release of his new film Jungleland, the 40-year-old actor opened up about future roles that he is interested in taking on and whether or not James Bond happens to be one of them.

Asked if he would ever be open to donning Bond’s tuxedo someday in the future, the Sons of Anarchy star says, “100 percent.”

“I would be so flattered and honored to be considered to play James Bond as an Englishman,” he adds. “But my intuition tells me that I shouldn’t be waiting for that phone call to come. I think there are many people ahead of me on that list.”

The actor characterized any rumors of him portraying the ever-popular spy as “external chatter,” adding it is sweet that fans want to see him take on the role that several other actors before him have — including the late Sean Connery.

“It’s very flattering sort of fan dialogue,” he says, before noting that there’s no truth to the rumors. “Nobody’s ever, on a professional level from within the industry, brought that up to me,” he explains.

Still, he encourages fans to keep associating his name with the role, as he says sometimes fans do play a role in helping to get actors cast to play certain characters.

“As much as people want to talk about me playing James Bond, please continue,” he shares. “Maybe that’s the genesis of these things. Maybe fan chatter leads to industry people actually talking about it in a more serious way.”

Even if he doesn’t come to play Bond one day in the future, Hunnam does have an actor in mind that could take over the mantle from Daniel Craig, who said that the upcoming Bond flick, No Time to Die, will be his last.

Hunnam tells PEOPLE Tom Hardy would make for a great spy.

“The person that I hear about in that conversation is Tom Hardy,” the actor says. “I hear that he’s really the front runner [to play James Bond next].”

He adds: “I think that would be sensational. I’m an enormous Tom Hardy fan so I would love to see him as James Bond.”

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Press: Charlie Hunnam Reveals the Real Reason He Turned Down ‘Forgetting Sarah Marshall’

Collider.com — Charlie Hunnam‘s new movie, Jungleland, sees him playing a rough-around-the-edges manager and coach to his younger brother (Jack O’Connell), a boxer looking for a break. When Collider’s own Christina Radish spoke with Hunnam recently about the movie and his role in it, their discussion took a brief detour into Hunnam’s past roles. In doing so, it reminded us of all the twists and turns his career has taken over the last 20 odd years that led him to this point, to Jungleland. Hunnam spoke to us about two of those big twists one being his brief run on the early ’00s TV comedy Undeclared. The other was a game-changing decision to not take a role in Forgetting Sarah Marshall — a decision he’s never spoken about until now.

But before we can share Hunnam’s incredible Forgetting Sarah Marshall story (which he says he revealed publicly to us for the first time ever), the actor spoke to us about working with Judd Apatow on the short-lived Fox comedy Undeclared. The show, which ran for the 2001-2002 season, followed a group of college freshmen through the highs and lows of college life. Hunnam played Lloyd, a suave lothario and roommate of Steven (Jay Baruchel), the show’s protagonist. Undeclared was Hunnam’s second major TV role to that point — following his role on the original British Queer as Folk — and his biggest step into comedy at that point, too. (Who better to guide you as a comedic actor than Apatow, eh?) Given his work history with Apatow on Undeclared, would Hunnam ever want to re-team with him on another project?

Yeah, it’s funny, I surprised myself, both of the things that I wrote this year, I wrote for myself and one of them is straight satire and the other one has got a very strong comedy component. So, yeah, when I sat down and started to write, my heart let me know that is certainly something that I want to pursue more. I don’t know specifically about that group. I would certainly work with Judd. I don’t know if he’d be interested in working with me. He has not demonstrated that desire, over the last few years. So, I think that might answer the question for us.”

When we joked that maybe Hunnam’s role as Jax Teller on FX’s Sons of Anarchy — his first major TV role post-Undeclared — was so off the beaten path of Apatow-esque entertainment that maybe it would scare the writer/director off, something seemed to click for Hunnam. To the joke, Hunnam answered with an intriguing story which eventually revealed why he had stepped away from the Apatow-produced 2008 comedy Forgetting Sarah Marshall— reasons which have largely been unclear to this day.

“Maybe. It’s funny, I’ll tell you a little story. Jason Segel wrote Forgetting Sarah Marshall for he and I to do together, and he wrote that [Russell Brand] role [of Aldous Snow] for me. I went and I did the table read and it was very successful. Judd was producing. I was in a dark night of the soul in my career, at that point, and felt as though I needed to seize the trajectory and that just wasn’t really aligning with, at that period of my life and career, what I wanted to be doing. Jason was one of my best friends [the pair had worked together on ‘Undeclared’], which is why he wrote the film for me, but I had to tell him, ‘I’m so sorry, I’m not gonna do this.’ It was one of those things where that wasn’t very well received by the inner circle of that production. I had to stand my ground and say, ‘Listen, it’s nothing personal. I’m just following my North star. I’m just in a weird spot and I’m trying to define for myself what the path forward is.’”

After declining to tackle the Aldous Snow role, Hunnam realized he’d made the right decision. Not just because of the personal and professional reasons he shared with us, but because it was obvious to him that Russell Brand was the best choice. Hunnam went on to tell us about the moment of clarity he had about Brand playing Aldous in the months after stepping away from Forgetting Sarah Marshall.

“It was one of those things where it was really difficult for me for the few months after that or a year after that, and then I saw this piece of stand-up. I didn’t know who Russell Brand was, but I saw this piece of stand-up that Russell Brand did on Christmas day with my mom. It was just this liberating moment where I said, ‘Obviously, that’s the dude who should have been playing that role. Clearly, I just needed to step out of the way of the universe manifesting itself, the way that it was supposed to.’ My relationship with Jason gave birth to that character, but there’s no way I could have done it justice the way Russell Brand did. I think there’s a rhythm to these things and you just have to really follow your instincts. It’s all you can really ever do. I suppose I brought that up because it’s a nice example of my instincts being proven to me that it was correct, I think. By the way, I’ve never told anyone that story before. I don’t know if that makes it attractive or not — but it’s a world exclusive.”

While we may never know what Hunnam would have brought to the role of Aldous Snow, we have numerous other killer performances from the Brit made at the same time as, and after, Forgetting Sarah Marshall. Hunnam took a huge leap in his career with the role of Jax Teller, playing the leader of a California biker gang from 2008 to 2014. Following his time on the gritty crime drama, Hunnam appeared in hits like Pacific Rim, Crimson Peak, and King Arthur: The Legend of the Sword. And you know what? That’s a pretty stellar trade-off if you ask me.

Jungleland is out on premium VOD beginning Tuesday, November 10.

Video/News/Photos: ‘Jungleland’ Starring Charlie Hunnam & Jack O’Connell Coming to VOD This November

Deadline.com — The gloves are off down in Jungleland.

Here is the first trailer for the film starring Charlie Hunnam and Jack O’Connell as two brothers struggling to stay relevant in the underground world of bare-knuckle boxing. Have a look above.

When Stan (Hunnam) fails to pay back a dangerous crime boss (Jonathon Majors), he and brother Lion (O’Connell) are they’re forced to deliver an unexpected traveler (Jessica Barden) as they journey across the country for a high-stakes fighting tournament. While Stan manages and trains Lion for the fight of his life, a series of events threatens to tear the brothers apart, but their love for each other and belief in a better life keep them going. John Cullum also stars.

Director Max Winkler called his 10-year passion project “a movie about toxic masculinity and brotherhood” and has cited inspiration from the 1973 Jack Nicholson film The Last Detail. He also co-wrote the script with Theodore Bressman and David Branson Smith. Romulus Entertainment and Scott Free are the key production companies that helped bring the film to fruition, and Ridley Scott has an executive producer credit on it. Brad Feinstein, Jules Daly, Kevin J. Walsh and Ryan Stowell are the producers.

Jungleland premiered at Toronto last year, and it will hit premium VOD on November 10 via Paramount Pictures.

In September it was reported by Deadline that Paramount Pictures had acquired the home entertainment and TV licensing rights Jungleland.

Charlie Hunnam to Star in Apple Series ‘Shantaram’

HollywoodReporter.com — The former ‘Sons of Anarchy’ star will play the lead role in the series based on a novel by Gregory David Roberts.

Charlie Hunnam is returning to TV.

The Sons of Anarchy star has taken his first series role since his FX show ended in 2014, signing on to drama Shantaram at Apple. The series from Paramount TV and Anonymous Content is the first international production for the tech giant’s nascent Apple TV+ streaming platform, which launches in November.

Shantaram, which is set for 10 episodes, is based on a best-selling novel by Gregory David Roberts. Hunnam will play Lin, a man on the run from an Australian prison who looks to get lost in the teeming city of Bombay. Cut off from family and friends by distance and fate, he finds a new life in the slums, bars and underworld of India. The novel also explores themes of love, forgiveness and courage on the road to redemption.

Eric Warren Singer (American Hustle, Top Gun: Maverick) adapted the novel and will executive produce with director Justin Kurzel (Assassin’s Creed), who will helm the first two episodes, Dave Erickson, Anonymous Content’s Steve Golin, Paramount TV president Nicole Clemens, Andrea Barron and Richard Sharkey.

Clemens helped Paramount TV and Anonymous win a bidding war for the project in early 2018 when she worked at Anonymous; she was named president of Paramount TV in November 2018.

Shantaram has previously been in development as a feature film with Joel Edgerton attached to star and Johnny Depp producing. When that didn’t go forward, Paramount TV and Anonymous Content won the rights to adapt the novel and follow-up The Mountain Shadow for TV.

Production is scheduled to begin in October in Australia and India.

Hunnam’s recent film work includes The Lost City of Z, Netflix’s Triple Frontier, True History of the Kelly Gang and Jungleland, the latter two of which premiered at the Toronto International Film Festival last week. He is repped by CAA, Brillstein Entertainment Partners and Sloane Offer.

Deadline first reported the news.

Charlie Hunnam’s New Film ‘The Gentlemen’ Gets Its Official Release Date

Yahoo.com — We now have an official release date for Charlie Hunnam’s latest film project, The Gentlemen. The former “Sons Of Anarchy” star will first be seen in The Gentlemen on Jan. 24, 2020.

‘The Gentleman’ a Good Fit For Hunnam

Hunnam says the script for Ritchie’s The Gentlemen is right up his alley:

“When I read the script, it’s sort of vintage Guy Ritchie. I grew up on Snatch and (the movie Lock, Stock, and Two Smoking Barrels), so when he sent me this script and invited me to be a part of it, I just jumped at the chance.”

Movie About the ‘California Marijuana Business’

It sounds like Hunnam has been contributing to the film in some way, meeting with director Guy Ritchie about the “California marijuana business.”

Hunnam spoke with “Entertainment Weekly” about his synergy with Ritchie:

“There’s some sort of weird alchemy to his filmmaking where he’s deeply collaborative and allows everybody to imbue the project with their own philosophy and world views, and yet it goes through the Guy Ritchie filter and unquestionably the result is Guy Ritchie sensibility.”

International Intrigue?

The description tagged for The Gentlemen sounds very cosmopolitan:

“A very British drug lord tries to sell off his highly profitable empire to a dynasty of Oklahoma billionaires.”

‘True History of the Kelly Gang’ to Premiere at 2019 Toronto International Film Festival

It was recently announced that director Justin Kurzel’s True History of the Kelly Gang will have its world premiere at the Toronto International Film Festival this year, which runs from September 5-15. Along with the announcement they released new photos from the film which includes one of Charlie. You can see below:

To find out when the premiere itself will be taking place be sure to check out the Official TIFF event page for showtimes which will be announced later this month.

For those who don’t know what True History of the Kelly Gang is about, here is a brief description:

A fictionalized re-telling of the life and crimes of infamous 19th-century Australian outlaw Ned Kelly, based on Peter Carey’s Booker Prize–winning novel. Starring Russell Crowe and Nicholas Hoult.

Charlie Hunnam opens up about leading in showbiz; says ‘Success is having the ability to keep moving forward’

TimesNowNews.com — Hollywood actor Charlie Hunnam believes that the defining characteristic that determines success in showbiz is the desire to be a storyteller with purity and authenticity. He says success is having the ability to keep moving forward and going to work.

Asked about the most futile aspect of being a star, Hunnam told select media including IANS here: “I would say almost everything about being famous is somewhat futile and irrelevant. Fame should be the perfume of great deeds. I’ve been in this business for 20 years and it seems the defining characteristic that determines success in this business is the desire to be a storyteller with purity and authenticity.”

“Success in this business is predicated on wanting to do as good a job and being compelled to tell stories and those that come in coveting fame and money and all the trappings of that tend to crash and burn really quickly.”

Hunnam, 38, who has acted in films including names such as Pacific Rim and Cold Mountain, said acting is a fairly difficult job, and it’s fairly difficult to sustain a career over many years.

“Really, the only success is having the ability to keep moving forward and going to work. That really is the greatest success of an actor’s career,” he added.

Triple Frontier, which had a theatrical release on March 6 in the US, also stars Oscar Isaac, Ben Affleck, Garrett Hedlund and Pedro Pascal.

Asked about doing away with the idea of toxic masculinity in the post-#MeToo era, Hunnam said: “I don’t believe that it is a celebration of toxic masculinity. It’s a specific story about specific people and just the reality is that contingent of this area is dominated by men — the special forces. It is slowly changing now…

“We certainly explore that question whether or not the mission would’ve unravelled the way it does if there had been more gender equality in it… in a woman’s point of view.”

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